about

The life of a Seoulite goes quickly. The days are brief and the hours fly by. The bustling city of Seoul whispers of promises and miracles. Here one will be able to experience the simplicity of romance and the rush of life. No other society blends culture and tradition with modernization as well as Seoul. Art is most prominent in Seoulite society, as well as business. Life in this beautiful city is about quality and grandeur.

agenda

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01 Myeongdeong.
02 Apgu Rodeo.
03 Han River.
04 Downtown.
05 Insadong.
06 Musical.

User info
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loveseoullove:

Hongdae

Super yummy croquette shop down the street from my guesthouse. It opens at 12:00pm until they sell-out, which was around 5:00pm…

(via han-nara)


lovesouthkorea:

If you want to experience a miracle during your time in Korea, then pay a visit to the Jindo Miracle Sea Festival, which runs from April 7 to April 9. Once a year in Jindo, a tidal phenomenon occurs and the sea miraculously “parts”. This phenomenon is caused due to the difference in high tides and low tides, which creates a 2.8-kilometer-long road measuring 40 to 60 meters in width. The spectacular sight of the waves parting is widely known and many people travel to Korea from all over the world just to witness this amazing event.


lovesouthkorea:

After travelling 10 km along the lakeside road from Cheongpyeong Dam, in the direction of Namiseom Island, you will come across a cluster of white, exotic buildings on the left-hand hillside. From its outward appearance, it would appear to be a village that belongs on the Mediterranean coast or in a pastoral area of the Piedmont Alps. This is Petite France, a French cultural village set in the Korean countryside! Petite France serves as both a French cultural village and a youth training facility (Goseong Youth Training Center), and consists of 16 French-style buildings where visitors can lodge and experience French food, clothing, and household culture. The concept of Petite France encapsulates ‘flowers, stars, and the Little Prince.’ The village contains a memorial hall dedicated to Saint-Exupery, the author of the celebrated French novel, Le Petit Prince (1943) and as such it is called the Little Prince theme park. It also has a gallery displaying sculptures and paintings of le coq gaulois (the Gallic rooster), the national symbol of France; Orgel House where a 200-year-old music box plays a sweet melody; a shop that sells herbal and aromatic products; a souvenir shop; and many other locales where you can experience French culture. The village can accommodate up to 200 visitors with 34 guest rooms that hold four to ten people each. 

(via lovesouthkorea)


lovesouthkorea:

Lotte World is a major recreation complex in Seoul, South Korea. It consists of the world’s largest indoor theme park (a Guinness World Record) which is open all year around, an outdoor amusement park called “Magic Island”, an artificial island inside a lake linked bymonorail, shopping malls, a luxury hotel, a Korean folk museum, sports facilities, and movie theaters all in one place. Opened on July 12, 1989, Lotte World receives over 8 million visitors each year and is considered along with Tokyo Disney Resort as one of the world-class theme parks in Asia.

(via lovesouthkorea)



lovesouthkorea:

Gangnam Station underground shopping arcade is one of the place which you can get the information about fashion trend of this season. Maybe flower pattern and vivid color will be popular in this spring.


lovesouthkorea:

Sinchon or Sinchon-dong is a neighbourhood in Seodaemun-gu in Seoul, South Korea. Sinchon is a busy area of the city and holds several department stores, cinemas and shopping areas that cater mainly to a young crowd. Also in the vicinity are several universities such as Yonsei University, Ewha Woman’s University, Hongik University, Sogang University and Myongji University. Sinchon is also one of the major entertainment districts with bars, karaoke rooms, PC-rooms, DVD rooms,Korean billiards halls and restaurants lining the streets covered in neon lights at night. Seoul’s second largest hospital, Severance Hospital, is linked with Yonsei University in Sinchon.


lovesouthkorea:

Insa-dong Street is one of the most memorable attractions in Seoul and represents the focal point of Korean traditional culture and crafts. During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the street was dominated by Dohwawon, a place of study for painters. The area is still a center for the arts, and painters, craftsmen, and art lovers continue to set up shop along the narrow alleys, making it a unique place full of folk crafts, pottery, and paintings. The street offers rich opportunities for visitors to experience Korean traditional culture and arts. Various art events and festivals are regularly held along the street

Stores in Insa-dong specialize in a wide variety of goods that can only be purchased or appreciated in Korea: hanbok (traditional clothing), hanji (traditional paper), traditional teas, pottery, and folk crafts. Approximately 40% of Korean crafts are exchanged in Insa-dong. Some products even trace back to the Three Kingdom Period (57 B.C.-668 A.D.) The most popular items are Korean ceramics ranging in price from hundreds of dollars to thousands of dollars. Other items sold in Insa-dong include earthenware, calligraphy materials, antique furniture, hanji, hanbok, teas, souvenirs, and cute accessories. Nearby shops include cafés, restaurants, ateliers, and galleries specializing in a diversity of items.

Vehicles are not permitted on the street during weekends, making it more amenable for visitors to look around. Insa-dong is also close to other tourist attractions such as Cheonggyecheon Stream and Gyeongbokgung (the royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty).

Back in Business

I’m pleased to say that this blog will be up and running once again. I looked through this blog and realized that there are so many memories I have stored from my trip to Seoul last Spring, and I would like to keep journaling. This blog will be dedicated to my friends who hope to travel to the city someday, and perhaps I will post a guide I’m creating on this blog. Until then, stay with me!


guixien:

Snowing in Seoul! Beautiful!

(via guixien-deactivated20130929)


k-popunited:

UNITED NATIONS OF KPOP!! WE’RE GOING TO KOREA!

It’s finally here! The DREAM TOUR KOREA! It’s the trip of a lifetime that has taken months of development to be custom tailored for fans just like you!

- VISIT THE AGENCIES LIKE YG / SM / JYP / CUBE
- LEARN KOREAN FROM WHERE THE STARS ATTENDED
- LEARN HOW TO DANCE FROM TOP CHOREOGRAPHERS
- HANG OUT WITH FANS LIKE YOURSELF!
- SEE THE SITES WHERE DRAMAS WERE SHOT
- $3,000 (ALL INCLUSIVE) IF BOOKED NOW

Check out the details on our newly updated website!

(via guixien-deactivated20130929)


Samwon Garden is famous for its marinated beef short ribs. Took my friend here for her birthday lunch on recommendation from my father. It was definitely worth it. The restaurant is located in Apgujeong, not too far from popular streets such as Rodeo Drive and Garusugil.


jobpagoda:

Hanok is a term to describe Korean traditional houses. Korean architecture lends consideration to the positioning of the house in relation to its surroundings, with thought given to the land and seasons.

The interior structure of the house is also planned accordingly. This principle is also called Baesanimsu (배산임수), literally meaning that the ideal house is built with a mountain in the back and a river in the front, with the ondol heated rock system for heating during cold winters and a wide daecheong (대청) front porch for keeping the house cool during hot summers.

Houses differ according to region. In the cold northern regions of Korea, houses are built in a closed square form to retain heat better. In the central regions, houses are ‘L’ shaped. Houses in the southernmost regions of Korea are built in an open ‘I’ form. Houses can also be classified according to class and social status.[1]

Characteristics

The environment-friendly aspects of traditional Korean houses range from the structure’s inner layout to the building materials which were used. Another unique feature of traditional houses is their special design for cooling the interior in summer and heating the interior in winter. Since Korea has hot summers and cold winters, the ‘Ondol(Gudeul),’ a floor-based heating system, and ‘Daecheong,’ a cool wooden-floor style hall were devised long ago to help Koreans survive the frigid winters and to block sunlight during summer. These primitive types of heating and air-conditioning were so effective that they are still in use in many homes today¹). The posts, or ‘Daedulbo’ are not inserted into the ground, but are fitted into the cornerstones to keep Hanok safe from earthquakes.

Materials

The raw materials used in Hanok, such as soil, timber, and rock, are all natural and recyclable and do not cause pollution. Hanok’s have their own tiled roofs (Giwa), wooden beams and stone-block construction. Cheoma is the edge of Hanok’s curvy roofs. The lengths of the Cheoma can be adjusted to control the amount of sunlight that enters the house. Hanji (Korean traditional paper) is lubricated with bean oil making it waterproof and polished. Windows and doors made with Hanji are beautiful and breathable.

Regional differences

The shapes of Hanok differ regionally. Due to the warmer weather in the southern region, Koreans built Hanok in a straight line like the number 1. In order to allow good wind circulation, there are open wooden floored living area and many windows. The shape of the most popular Hanok in the central region is like letter “L” or Korean letter “ㄱ”, an architectural mixture of the shapes in the northern and the southern regions. Hanoks in the cold northern region, are box-shaped like Korean letter “ㅁ” so that it would be able to block the wind flow in building Hanoks. They do not have an open wooden floored area but the rooms are all joined together.

Differences according to social class

The structure of Hanok is also classified according to social class. Typical yangban (upper class) houses with giwa (tiled roof) emphasized not only the function of the house, but also possess great artistic value. On the other hand, the houses of the commoners (as well as some impoverished yangban) with choga (a roof plaited by rice straw) were built in a more strictly functional manner.

(via woojis-deactivated20130615)


Found a really awesome map of Garosugil on the net.